Special projects  | 
Barbarians

They kept waiting on. Sparse snow descended slowly upon faces tilting upward and melted, turning into water that slipped down behind collars to mingle with sweat.

Pavel Akimov & Alexander Polevoi. Dream Catcher. 2012. Wood, metal, stone, jute Courtesy of the artists

They kept waiting on.

Sparse snow descended slowly upon faces tilting upward and melted, turning into water that slipped down behind collars to mingle with sweat.

Nobody knew for sure where they were coming from, but everybody felt their world as they knew it was to come to an end. There were rumors that they came down from the mountains, and there were others who said they came out of the desert, and others claiming it all to be gibberish and that the barbarians were nonexistent.

The Empire grew too large—out of its borders. The administrative centers became uncontrollable and the Empire built from the ground up now...

The fear and greed of its citizens had brought the Empire to endless decadence, lack of restraint, sloth and stagnation. News of the barbarians approaching came virtually without notice. Initially a whisper, it soon reached every ear.

Alexey Korsi

July 2, 2014

On June 24 and 25, 4th Moscow International Biennale for Young Art began. 3069 applications by artists under 35 from 84 countries of the world were submitted for the competition, which lasted from November 2013 through March 2014. David Elliott, Artistic Director of the Biennale, proposed the motto A Time for Dreams as the general theme, and curated the main Biennale project, which presented works by 83 artists from 32 countries of the world.

June 17, 2014

The educational program of the Biennale, curated by Antonio Geusa and coordinated by Ekaterina Razdumina, is entitled Wise Advice, and aims at helping young artists to find answers to various questions that concern their creative growth and career development.